A Response to a Friend…

Thank you for forwarding former rock journalist Tony Parsons' 9/11/2002 Daily Mirror column in which he claims that "to the world's eternal shame, 9/11 is increasingly seen as America's comeuppance." He then goes on to describe at length his admiration for what he considers the restraint shown by the United States in responding to the attack on the World Trade Centers, as well as his contempt for those in Europe and elsewhere who have the audacity to disagree with the policy followed by the U.S. in the wake of 9/11. In short, his argument runs: 9/11 was really awful, the U.S. is really wonderful has been and marvelously restrained, so no-one should take issue with any of the actions the U.S. has taken or may choose to take; indeed, anyone who dares to do so must be a despicable traitor.

I take the forward of the message to mean that the sender agrees with Mr. Parsons sentiments, and while his thoughts on anti-Americanism, revenge, and restraint provided quite some food for thought. I respectfully suggest that not everyone would consider his editorial a "must-read"; I have therefore tried to respond to some of the more unpalatable and far-fetched of his arguments below…

Remember, Remember

Remember the words of the founding fathers: "all men are created equal." Surely that is the case, but just as surely the claim cannot be limited to American citizens? Of course the attack on 9/11 was awful. But before the death of those innocent Americans is (ab)used by the U.S. government to justify the killing of more innocent people, is it not worth heeding the words of one of the clergymen to the assembled Congressmen and Senators at the memorial service in DC after 9/11: "Let us not become the evil we deplore"?

Exaggeration rarely accomplishes much, and Mr. Parsons fails to convince when he compares 9/11 with Nazi Germany and Pol Pot